Red Rock Canyon Campground Reopens August 30

LAS VEGAS – Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area’s developed campground will reopen Friday, August 30, in time for the beginning of its busiest camping season. Cooler temperatures during the fall and winter months make Red Rock Canyon a destination for visitors from around the world.

Red Rock Campground is located within Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area, approximately two miles east of the Visitor Center on State Route 159 (West Charleston Boulevard). It is the only developed campground within the Conservation Area.  The campground features 53 individual campsites, 14 walk-to sites, six dry RV sites and seven group campsites.

Individual sites are $20 per site/night and can be reserved at www.recreation.gov.

The 14 walk-up campsites are offered on a first-come first-served basis and are $10 per night.

Group campsites are $60 per site/night and require reservations.Reservations for group campsites can be made by visiting www.recreation.gov.

The campground is scheduled to remain open until June 1, 2020, and will then close for the low-usage summer season.

Backcountry camping is allowed within Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area above 5,000 feet in the Rainbow Mountain Wilderness, and above 6,500 feet in the La Madre Mountain Wilderness. A permit is required and can be obtained by calling: 702-515-5050.

Camping is also allowed on BLM managed public land outside of the Las Vegas Valley for up to two weeks without charge. Popular primitive (no facilities) sites include Bitter Spring Back Country Byway, Gold Butte Back Country Byway, Knob Hill, Virgin Mountains, Christmas Tree Pass and Logandale Trails System.

Volunteers Spotlight – Our Campground Hosts and Hostesses

Bob Brewer

How long have you been a campground host at Red Rock Canyon Campground?

Five Seasons.

Who inspires you?

Jimmy Carter for his intelligence and volunteering.

What is the best concert you have attended?

Beach Boys at California Jam in the 70s.

If you could be any animal, which animal would you
be?

Mountain Lion because it lives in the unspoiled wild
and is able to thrive.

What are you currently watching on TV/Netflix/Hulu?

Laramie on the Western Channel on Dish Network.

What’s the coolest thing you’re working on right now?

Restoring my body after thyroid cancer.

What are you passionate about?

Protecting our environment for generations to come.

Kathy Brewer

How long have you been a campground host at Red
Rock Canyon Campground?

Five Seasons.

Who inspires you?

Michelle Obama because she works to help children.

What is the best concert you have attended?

Doc Watson Blue Grass Music

If you could be any animal, which animal would you
be?

Bald Eagle.

What are you currently watching on TV/Netflix/Hulu?

Live PD.

What’s the coolest thing you’re working on right now?

Learning Recreation.gov

What are you passionate about?

To save the forest and wildlife

Dennis Lambert

How long have you been a campground host at Red
Rock Canyon Campground?

This is my first season (spent the last six years in Lake
Tahoe area.)

Who inspires you?

My wife Barb.

What is the best concert you have attended?

George Strait.

If you could be any animal, which animal would you
be?

Eagle of course.

What are you currently watching on TV/Netflix/Hulu?

Whatever my wife has on the TV.

What’s the last book you read?

Lord of The Rings.

What are you passionate about?

Just plain helping people.

Barb Lambert

How long have you been a campground host at Red
Rock Canyon Campground?

This is my first season (spent the last six years in
Lake Tahoe area.)

Who inspires you?

Dennis (my husband). We inspire each other to
always be the best we can be each day.

What is the best concert you have attended?

George Strait (Country Legend).

If you could be any animal, which animal would you
be?

Butterfly

What are you currently watching on TV/Netflix/Hulu?

Big Brother and America Got Talent.

What’s the coolest thing you’re working on right now?

Getting all setup at the new host here at Red Rock!

What are you passionate about?

Being Kind and helping others.

 

Click here to learn how you can make reservations at the Red Rock Canyon Campground.

 

Red Rock Canyon Campground Now Open

Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area’s developed campground will reopen Friday, August 31, in time for the beginning of its busiest camping season. Cooler temperatures during the fall and winter months make Red Rock Canyon a destination for visitors from around the world.

Red Rock Campground is located within Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area, approximately two miles east of the Visitor Center on State Route 159 (West Charleston Boulevard). It is the only developed campground within the Conservation Area. The campground features 80 individual campsites and seven group campsites.

Individual sites are filled first-come, first-served for stays before January 1, 2019 and are $20 per site/night. For stays beginning January 1, 2019, 66 of the 80 single campsites will be available by reservation at www.recreation.gov. Reservations will open on the website October 15, 2018. The remaining 14 campsites will continue to be offered on a first-come first-served basis.

Group campsites are $60 per site/night and require reservations. Reservations for group campsites can be made by visiting www.recreation.gov.

The campground is scheduled to remain open until May 28, 2019, and will then close for the low-usage summer season.

Backcountry camping is allowed within Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area above 5,000 feet in the Rainbow Mountain Wilderness, and above 6,500 feet in the La Madre Mountain Wilderness. A permit is required and can be obtained by calling: 702-515-5050.

Camping is also allowed on BLM managed public land outside of the Las Vegas Valley for up to two weeks without charge. Popular primitive (no facilities) sites include Bitter Spring Back Country Byway, Gold Butte Back Country Byway, Knob Hill, Virgin Mountains, Christmas Tree Pass and Logandale Trails System.

REI’s Back Pack Check List

REI, a major sponsor of Friends of Red Rock Canyon, provides this handy check list for campers, hikers and climbers who enjoy the Red Rocks

Friends thank REI for all their support.

REI’s check list is your tried-and-true guide to packing smart. The list is intentionally comprehensive so don’t forget anything important.

To locate a nearby REI, click here.

THE 10 ESSENTIALS

Navigation

  • Map (with protective cover)
  • Compass
  • GPS (optional)
  • Altimeter (optional

Sun Protection

  • Sunscreen
  • Lip Balm
  • Sunglasses

Insulation

  • Jacket
  • Vest
  • Pants
  • Gloves
  • Hat (see clothing)

Illumination

  • Headlamp or flashlight
  • Extra batteries

First-Aid Supplies

  • First-aid Kit

Fire

  • Matches or lighter
  • Waterproof container
  • Fire starter (for emergency survival fire)

 

 

Repair Kit and Tools

  • Knife or multi-tool
  • Repair kits for stove, mattress
  • Duct tape strips

Nutrition

  • Extra day’s supply of food

Hydration

  • Water bottles or hydration reservoirs
  • Water filter or other treatment system

Emergency Shelter

  • Tent
  • Tarp
  • Bivy
  • Reflective blanket

 

Beyond the 10 ESSENTIALS

  • Backpack
  • Daypack or summit pack
  • Pack cover
  • Tent, tarp or bivy sack with stakes and guylines
  • Tent-pol repair sleeve
  • Footprint
  • Sleeping bag
  • Stuff sack or compression sack
  • Sleeping pad
  • Pillow or stuffable pillow case
  • Whistle
  • Multifunctional watch with altimeter
  • Ice axe
  • Meals
  • Energy food (bars, gels, chews, trail mix)
  • Energy beverages or drink mixes
  • Stove
  • Fuel
  • Cook set with pot grabber
  • Dishes or bowls
  • Utensils
  • Cups
  • Bear canister
  • Nylon cord (50 feet)
  • Backup water treatment
  • Collapsible sink or container
  • Packable lantern

 

Clothing for Warm Weather

  • Wicking T-shirt
  • Wicking underwear
  • Quick-drying pants or short
  • Long-sleeve shirt
  • Sun-shielding hat
  • Bandana or Buff

 

Clothing for Cold Weather

  • Wicking long-sleeve T-shirt
  • Wicking long underwear
  • Hat, cap, skullcap, balaclava or headband
  • Rainwear
  • Fleece jacket or vest, and pants

 

Footwear and Personal Items

  • Hiking boots or hiking shoes suited to terrain
  • Socks
  • Gaiters
  • Sandals for fording and in camp
  • Camera or helmet cam
  • Extra memory cards
  • Binoculars
  • Permits
  • Route description or guidebook
  • Field guide; star identifier
  • Outdoor journal and pen or pencil
  • Credit card
  • Small amount of cash
  • Earplugs
  • Eye Shade
  • Toilet paper
  • Sanitation trowel
  • Hand sensitizer
  • Insect repellant
  • Bear Spray
  • Biodegradable soap and shower bag
  • Quick-dry towel
  • Cell phone/satellite communicator/2-way radio
  • Personal locator beacon
  • Post-hike snacks, water, towel, clothing change
  • Trip itinerary left with friend and under car seat

Camping in Red Rock Canyon

Bureau of Land Management 

 

Campground Location 

3293 Moenkopi Rd 

Las Vegas, NV 89161 

Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area has one developed campground.  Red Rock Canyon Campground is located two miles east of the Visitor Center on west Charleston Boulevard (State Route 159) and then one mile south on Moenkopi Road.  

General Information 

The campground is accessible 24 hours a day.  There is no check-in for individual sites, however, payment of fees must be made within 30 minutes of arrival at the self-registration station. Campers with tents and recreational vehicles are intermixed in the area.  

  • There are no electrical, water and sewer hook-ups.   
  • There is no dump station.   
  • There are no showers. 
  • Shade is provided at all of the group sites and half of the individual sites. 
  • Restrooms are vault toilets.  
  • Water faucets for drinking water are located throughout the campground.   
  • No firewood available on-site. 
  • Picnic tables, campfire rings & grills are located at all sites except the walk-in sites. 
  • Walk-in sites don’t have campfire rings, shade structures or tent pads. 
  • Campground closes over the summer from around Memorial Day to Labor Day. 
  • Check in is 12pm, check out is 11am. 

Individual Campsites  

The campground has 72 individual campsites (including 14 walk-in, 5 RV & 3 accessible sites).  To make campsite availability fair to all, there is a 14-day limit in effect. Individual sites are not reservable. 

  • Limit 10 people per campsite. 
  • $20 per night per site. Walk-in sites are $10 per night per site. 
  • Two vehicles per site. 
  • A sand tent pad is provided for approximately 2 tents. 

Group Campsites 

The campground has 7 group campsites which are available through reservation. 

 

  • 10 to 15 people per site. 
  • $60 per night per site. 
  • Up to eight vehicles per site. 
  • Each site has about 12 areas for tents. 
  • Not a day use area. At least 10 campers must be spending the night. 
  • Each group site has about 12 areas for tents, some of which can fit 2 small tents. 
  • Check in required 
  • Commercial groups require additional permitting 
  • Reservations made on www.recreation.gov 
  • Campground Rules 
  • You are responsible for knowing campground rules and regulations. 

 

  • Generators are permitted between the hours of 6 a.m. and 10 p.m. 
  • Quiet hours are from 10 p.m. until 6 a.m. (the use of generators, radios, music players etc., are prohibited during this time). 
  • Pets must be leashed and attended at all times. Waste must be cleaned up & thrown away. 
  • Maximum 14-day limit in any 28-day period. 

 

America the Beautiful (the National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass Series) Senior and Access pass holders receive a 50% discount on individual site camping fees. No discount on group sites. 

No refunds are issued for individual sites. 

Campground Availability 

It is not suggested to arrive in the middle of the night in the hopes of locating an empty campsite, especially during the fall and spring. The Thanksgiving and Christmas holiday periods are also very busy as are other holiday weekends.   

To Assist You  

Campground hosts live on-site and volunteer for the Bureau of Land Management.  They are there to assist you in making your visit as enjoyable as possible. 

The Ten Essentials

Compliments of REI

Packing the “Ten Essentials” whenever you step into the backcountry, even on day hikes, is a good habit. True, on a routine trip you may use only a few of them or none at all. It’s when something goes awry that you’ll truly appreciate the value of carrying these items that could be essential to your survival.

The original Ten Essentials list was assembled in the 1930s by The Mountaineers, a Seattle-based organization for climbers and outdoor adventurers, to help people be prepared for emergency situations in the outdoors. Back then, the list included a map, compass, sunglasses and sunscreen, extra clothing, headlamp/flashlight, first-aid supplies, fire starter, matches, knife and extra food.

Over the years, the list has evolved to a “systems” approach rather than including individual items.

Here’s what it looks like today, compliments of REI, a Friends’ partner:

 

Updated Ten Essential Systems

  1. Navigation: map, compass, altimeter, GPS device, personal locator beacon (PLB) or satellite messenger
  2. Headlamp: plus extra batteries
  3. Sun protection: sunglasses, sun-protective clothes and sunscreen
  4. First aid: including foot care and insect repellent (as needed)
  5. Knife: plus a gear repair kit
  6. Fire: matches, lighter, tinder and/or stove
  7. Shelter: carried at all times (can be a light emergency bivy)
  8. Extra food: Beyond the minimum expectation
  9. Extra water: Beyond the minimum expectation
  10. Extra clothes: Beyond the minimum expectation

The exact items from each system that you take can be tailored to the trip you’re taking. For example, on a short day hike that’s easy to navigate you might choose to take a map, compass and PLB, but leave your GPS and altimeter behind. On a longer, more complex outing, you might decide you want all those tools to help you find your way. When deciding what to bring, consider factors like weather, difficulty, duration, and distance from help.

Continue reading below for more information about each of the Ten Essential systems. And for help figuring out what else to bring with you, check out our hiking checklists.

1. Navigation

A compass sits on a topographic map

Contemporary navigation tools include five essentials for traveling in the backcountry: a map, compass, altimeter watch, GPS device and personal locator beacon (PLB). Here’s more detail:

  • Map: A topographic map should accompany you on any trip that involves anything more than a short, impossible-to-miss footpath or frequently visited nature trail. Learn how to read a topo map.
  • Compass: A compass, combined with map-reading knowledge, is a vital tool if you become disoriented in the backcountry. Many smartphones, GPS devices and watches include electronic compasses, but it’s wise to also carry a standard baseplate compass because it weighs next to nothing and does not rely on batteries, making it an indispensable backup. Learn how to use a compass.

Note: A compass equipped with a sighting mirror can also be used to flash sunlight to a helicopter or rescuer during an emergency.

Shop compasses

  • GPS device: A GPS device allows you to accurately find your location on a digital map. Those designed specifically for outdoor travel are often built rugged and weatherproof. Another popular option is to use a smartphone with a GPS app, but consider that most phones are more fragile so you’ll likely need to protect it with a case. Whichever you choose, keep in mind that these gadgets run on batteries, so you’ll need to monitor your battery power and possibly carry extra batteries. Learn more about choosing and using a GPS.

Shop GPS devices

  • Altimeter watch: This is a worthwhile navigational extra to consider bringing along. It uses a barometric sensor to measure air pressure and/or GPS data to provide a close estimate of your elevation. This info helps you track your progress and determine your location on a map.

Shop altimeter watches

  • Personal locator beacon (PLB) or satellite messenger: These gadgets can be used to alert emergency personnel if you need help in the backcountry. When activated in an emergency, they will determine your position using GPS and send a message via government or commercial satellites. A PLB or satellite messenger can be a nice backup to have in case something goes awry, and they will work in remote locations where a cell phone cannot be counted on to have a signal. Learn more about PLBs and satellite messengers.

Shop PLBs and satellite messengers

2. Headlamp

Two headlamps sitting on top of a backpacking pack

Being able to find your way through the wilderness at night is essential, so you always need to have a light source with you. A headlamp is the preferred choice of most backcountry travelers because it keeps your hands free for all types of tasks, whether that’s cooking dinner or holding trekking poles. Always carry extra batteries. Learn more about headlamps.

Shop headlamps

3. Sun Protection

A backpacker wearing a sun hat, sunglasses, and sun-protection clothing

Always pack with you and wear sunglasses, sun-protection clothing and sunscreen. Not doing so can result in sunburn and/or snow blindness in the short term and potentially premature skin aging, skin cancer and cataracts in the long term.

  • Sunglasses: Quality sunglasses are indispensable in the outdoors to protect your eyes from potentially damaging radiation. If you’re planning prolonged travel on snow or ice, you’ll need extra-dark glacier glasses. All sunglasses sold at REI block 100 percent of ultraviolet light (UVA and UVB)—a key function of quality lenses. UVB rays, the rays that can burn your skin, have been linked to the development of cataracts. Groups should carry at least one pair of spare sunglasses in case someone loses theirs or forgets to bring them. Learn more about sunglasses.

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  • Sunscreen: Spending long hours outdoors can expose you to ultraviolet rays, the cause of sunburn, premature skin aging and skin cancer. Wearing sunscreen is recommended to help limit your exposure to UV. When selecting a sunscreen, health experts advise choosing:
    • A formula that offers a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15, though SPF 30 is recommended for extended outdoor activity.
    • A formula that blocks both UVA and UVB rays.

Apply the sunscreen generously and thoroughly to all exposed skin. UV rays can reflect off of snow and water so don’t forget to get spots like the underside of your chin and nose. Depending on many factors (time of day, sweat and more), you should reapply as often as every two hours. And don’t overlook SPF-rated lip balm. Learn more about buying and applying sunscreen.

Shop sunscreen

  • Sun-protection clothing: Clothing can be an effective way of blocking UV rays from reaching your skin without having to slather on sunscreen (you’ll still need sunscreen for any exposed skin, like your face, neck and hands). Many lightweight, synthetic pieces of clothing come with an ultraviolet protection factor (UPF) rating to indicate how effective the pieces are against UVA and UVB light. A hat, preferably one with a full brim, is a key accessory for sun protection. Learn more about sun-protection clothing.

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4. First Aid

A first-aid kit lies open on top of a backpacking pack

It’s vital to carry and know how to use the items in a first-aid kit. Pre-assembled first-aid kits take the guesswork out of building your own, though many people personalize these kits to suit individual needs. Any kit should include treatments for blisters, adhesive bandages of various sizes, several gauze pads, adhesive tape, disinfecting ointment, over-the-counter pain medication, pen and paper. Nitrile gloves should also be included.

The length of your trip and the number of people involved will impact the contents of your kit. It’s also a good idea to carry some sort of compact guide to dealing with medical emergencies. Learn more about first-aid kits.

Shop first-aid kits

Find a wilderness medicine class

5. Knife

An array of pocket and camping knives sit on a wooden surface

Knives are handy for gear repair, food preparation, first aid, making kindling or other emergency needs, making them an essential for every outing. Every adult in your group should carry a knife.

A basic knife may have only a single foldout blade; more elaborate knives and multitools include things like one or two flathead screwdrivers, a can opener and/or a pair of foldout scissors. The more complex your needs (if, for example, you are leading an inexperienced group), the more options you may want in your knife or tool. Get help choosing a knife.

In addition to a knife, a small gear repair kit can get you out of a bind in the backcountry (and the more remote you are, the more important your kit becomes). Common items include duct tape, cordage, fabric repair tape, zip ties, safety pins and repair parts for a water filter, tent poles, stove, sleeping pad, crampons, snowshoes and skis. Check out our Backpacking Repair Kit Checklist for more ideas.

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Shop gear repair

6. Fire

A detail shot of a campfire

In case of an emergency, you need to have reliable supplies with you for starting and maintaining a fire. For many people, this is a disposable butane lighter, but matches are also suitable so long as they are waterproof or stored in a waterproof container. Convenience-store matchbooks are often too flimsy and poorly constructed to be trusted for wilderness use.

Firestarter, as the name implies, is an element that helps you jump-start a fire and is indispensable in wet conditions. The ideal firestarter ignites quickly and sustains heat for more than a few seconds. Options include dry tinder tucked away in a plastic bag, candles, priming paste, heat “nuggets” (chipped-wood clusters soaked in resin) and even lint trappings from a household clothes dryer.

For outings where firewood is not available, such as trips above tree line and/or on snow, a stove is recommended as an emergency heat and water source.

Shop fire-starting gear

7. Emergency Shelter

A woman pulls an emergency blanket out of her daypack

Always carry some type of emergency shelter to protect you from wind and rain in case you get stranded or injured on the trail. Options include an ultralight tarp, a bivy sack, an emergency space blanket (which packs small and weighs just ounces) or even a large plastic trash bag. It’s important to understand that your tent is only your emergency shelter if you have it with you at all times (a tent left behind at your camp is not sufficient).

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8. Extra Food

A bowl of granola and an assortment of dried fruits

Always pack at least an extra day’s worth of food in case something causes your trip to go long (such as an injury or bad weather). It’s a good idea to pack items that don’t require cooking and that have a long shelf life. Things like extra energy bars, nuts, dried fruits or jerky are good.

If you’re going on a long multiday trek or a winter adventure, consider bringing along more than a one-day supply.

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9. Extra Water

A water filter sits on a rock

It’s crucial to carry enough water for your outing and have some method of treating water while you’re out there, whether that’s with a filter/purifier, chemical treatment or a stove for melting snow. When determining how much water to carry exactly, consider that most people need about a half liter per hour during moderate activity in moderate temperatures. You may need to carry more than that depending on factors like the outside temperature, altitude, level of exertion or an emergency.

As a starting point, always carry at least one water bottle or a collapsible water reservoir. When beginning a hike, fill up your bottle or reservoir from a potable water source. Learn more about hydration.

Shop water bottles and treatment options

10. Extra Clothes

A backpacker pulling extra clothes out of her pack

Conditions can abruptly turn wet, windy or chilly in the backcountry or an injury can result in an unplanned night out, so it’s necessary to carry extra clothes beyond those required for your trip.

When deciding what to bring, think about what you would need to survive a long, inactive period out in the elements. Common options include a layer of underwear (tops and bottoms), an insulating hat or balaclava, extra socks, extra gloves and a synthetic jacket or vest. For winter outings, bring insulation for your upper body and legs. For help getting started, see our articles, What to Wear Hiking and Layering Basics.

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